FOR SALE: Stars-N-Bar Hopper – 1983 Harley-Davidson Sportster XLH 1000 Ironhead Bobber

Oden Motor Shop is proud to offer for sale our latest project: “Stars-N-Bar Hopper.”

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This is 1983 Harley-Davidson Sportster XLH 1000 was rebuilt in spring of 2014. It was converted into a “mild” hard-tail bobber with classic Army Air Core paint scheme.

The original speedo was in excess of 38,000 miles, but the rebuilt engine and aftermarket speedo have 50 miles as of this listing.

It has the standard factory four-speed transmission.

It has an S&S Super E “Shorty” carburetor, properly jetted and tuned.

This is a “mild” hard tail using struts in place of shocks: the frame is original and can be easily converted back to factor if you value comfort more than cool.

A spring-mounted solo seat makes the hard-tail a little less hard-on-the-tail.

It has has a side-mounted tail-light and license plate.

It has no turn signals (other than those mounted on your shoulder, also known as your left arm).

The front and rear brake pads have more than 75% remaining, and there is no scoring on the disks.

The tires are in great shape with plenty of tread.

The battery is new and has a battery tender cable installed.

The oil and filter were changed in April, the brakes were serviced and the clutch was serviced and adjusted.

The bike is registered in Virginia with a current safety inspection and is ready to ride today.

SALE PRICE: $3,500.00

If you’re interested in purchasing or scheduling a demo, email curtis@odenmotorshop.com.

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SOLD: 1986 Honda Shadow VT1100C

THIS BIKE HAS BEEN SOLD!

I picked up this 1986 Honda Shadow VT1100C a few months ago and started restoring it for a bobber project. I’ve got it running now, but other projects are taking priority. This will make a great bobber, or it comes with a box of parts for complete restoration. The motor has about 52,000 miles on it, but is still running strong. It could be road-ready with solid weekend’s worth of work.

Here’s the good news:
  • Clean Virginia title
  • Strong motor with great compression
  • Transmission shifts through all gears
  • Newly sealed gas tank
  • New battery
  • New spark plugs
  • Fresh oil change and new filter
  • Recently cleaned air filter
  • Recent radiator flush
  • Exhaust in good shape
  • Original seat in EXCELLENT condition
  • All lights operational
  • Excellent clutch operation
  • Excellent front and rear brake function
  • Excellent front brake disks /rotors
  • Good rear drum brake shoes
  • No fluid leaks (it’s a Honda!)
  • Comes with physical Haynes manual and electronic Honda Shop Manual
  • The bike comes with a set of aftermarket turn signals and stems that just need to be installed.
Here’s the bad news:
  • Missing right side battery cover
  • Front and read tires hold air, but have dry rot
  • Missing fuse box cover
  • Surface rust on exhaust heat shield (appears to just chrome deterioration)
  • Broken turn signal stems (signals still work) (aftermarket replacement signals included in sale)
While I don’t offer a warranty on any used or project bikes I sell, I’m always willing to share technical knowledge with people who purchase my bikes. If you’re local, I’m also happy to lend a hand turning a wrench on a Saturday afternoon (as long as you provide the beer).

Check out the listing on eBay.

SOLD: Honda Bobber – Retro Army Air Core

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Built from a 1984 Honda Shadow VT 700C, this Army Air Core inspired bobber is a fun ride and real head turner.The bike has 40,600 plus miles, but the rock-solid, well-maintained Honda V-Twin has another 60,000 miles in it before the next overhaul. It has a new Virginia safety inspection valid until May, 2014, and is registered in Virginia with a clean title. The tires have 10,000 miles or so left in them.Over the last six months, I rebuilt the bike from the ground up. including carbs, clutch master and slave cylinders, front brake calipers, clutch, pulse generators, alternator, ignition system, and more. It has a fresh oil change, and brakes, forks, and cooling system have been recently serviced.In addition to being converted to a bobber, I’ve made the following customizations:

  • Custom leather sprung solo seat
  • Ignitech ignition control unit
  • High performance Keihin carburator modifications and jet
  • High performance air filter and intake modifications
  • Transparent glass/chrome fuel filter
  • LED marker light and turn module (currently wired up only for marker lights)
  • New battery
  • 12vdc accessory / battery tender port
  • New stator/alternator
  • Custom drag pipes with titanium heat wrap, mini baffles (so it’s loud but not obnoxious) and chrome tips
  • Burly Slammer Shocks
  • “Streetfighter” fairing with internal mounts for GPS, iPhone, etc
  • Custom fabricated forward controls and floor boards
  • Aftermarket handgrips
  • High-visibility mirrors
  • 2.5 gallon gas tank
  • Aftermarket clutch hydraulic line
  • Custom fabricated retro-style side-mount tail light and license plate bracket.
  • LED wheel rim lights
  • Cammo Green Plasti Dip paint job (leaves original paint intact)
This bike is ready to ride today.

View the eBay Auction.

Photo Gallery: 1984 Honda VT 700C Bobber Project

This 1984 Honda Shadow VT 700C is being rebuilt from the ground up, and then chopped back down again to create a bobber.

Vote on Your Favorite Color for the Honda Bobber

It’s almost time to start bolting the last pieces back together on the 1984 Honda Shadow VT 700C Bobber Project. The responses from the previous Post-Apocalyptic Zombie Bobber survey were a bit unclear, so I decided to give ya’ll a simple choice: what color should I paint this bike? Here are a few mockups, so let me know what you think. If your preferred color isn’t there, let me know, and I’ll see if i can mock it up, too!

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Floor Matte Black

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Gunmetal Gray

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Lil’ Boy Blue

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Fabulous! Pink

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You Can Pry My Assault Rifle Out of My Dead, Cold Hands Green

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Rusted Red

Honda Bobber Project Survey: Do We Need A Fender?

Should the VT 700C Bobber have a rear fender or none? Here it is with the rear tire bare.
Should the VT 700C Bobber have a rear fender or none? Here it is with the rear tire bare.

Here is the VT 700C Bobber Project with the rear fender mocked up.
Here is the VT 700C Bobber Project with the rear fender mocked up.

The 1984 Honda VT 700C Bobber Project is moving along quickly. There’s still several mechanical issue that need to be resolved, but while I’m waiting on parts, I’ve decided to spend some time on the cosmetics. While this may be a rat bike, I want it to at least be a pretty rat.

I’m really on the fence right now on whether or not I should put a hacked trailer fender over the rear wheel, or if I should leave the rubber exposed (and potentially my rear end if I slide off the seat). Since I can’t seem to make the decision myself, I’ve decided to reach out to Oden Motor Shop fans to help with this age-old aesthetic dilemma: to fender, or not to feder?

Take a look at the photos of the bike mocked up with fender and without, and share your comments below. I still have the front fender on the bike, but I would like to hear opinions on that as well.

2013 International Motorcycle Show – Washington, DC

Oden Motor Shop doesn’t have much of a travel budget, so we don’t get to do the trade show circuit very often. When we do, it usually involves months of planning, loads of money, and lots of headaches. If Sturgis or Daytona are involved, there’s usually a pricey divorce shortly after. You can imagine my excitement when I learned the 2013 Progressive International Motorcycle Show was being held the first week of January in Washington, DC, right across the Potomac river from our shop in Alexandria, VA. All I had to do was find parking in downtown DC. Here is a sample of what I saw there.

Pulse Generator Transplant

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After troubleshooting every other electrical component on my 1984 Honda Shadow VT700C, I determined I’m not getting spark because I have a bad pulse generator. Later model bikes use a single pulse, but the ’84 VT700C has two pulse generators, one for each cylinder. This equates to double the possibility of failure and headache cubed when one or the other it actually does fail, since they have to be replaced together as an assembly.

Testing the pulse generators is a pretty simple process of disconnecting the pulse generator assembly from the rest of the electrical system and taking an OHM reading on the leads for each pulse generator. The connector is easily assessable, tucked away on the right side of the crankcase by the fuel filter.

One of the pulse generators tested at 440 OHMs, well within tolerances. The other pegged out my multimeter, indicating a bad pulse generator.

Finding a “new” OEM replacement proved to be impossible. At least three websites claimed to have the part, but when I spoke to a live salesperson, in each case I was told the part was discontinued and no one manufactures a replacement.

I tracked down a used pulse generator assembly on eBay. It’s amazing that idiots like me desperate enough to spend $100 for a $10 part. Since the one I picked up was the lowest priced on eBay, and since the VT700 is scrap metal without one, I considered myself lucky.

While testing the pulse generators is easy, replacing them is a pain. I had to remove the right foot controls, the right-side exhaust, part of the frame, the right crank case cover, and both the clutch inner and outer.

Before installing the “new” pulse generator assembly and putting the bike back together, I decided to test it. Just like the original, it had one good pulse generator and one failed pulse generator.

In the spirit of Dr. Frankenstein, I began hacking at the two assemblies, tossing the bad generators in the junk bin and cobbling the two good generators into a single pulse generator assembly.

When I began routing the pulse generator wiring back through the crankcase, I discovered I had shorted one cable by half an inch. Clearances are tight in the crank case, with the wiring routed around several moving parts, so that half inch may as well have been a mile.

I set my Frankenstein’s monster of a pulse generator assembly to the side, and decided to take a break to check my email and check the status of some other parts on order from eBay. On a whim, I checked to see if anyone had posted another pulse generator assembly.

And there it was: a pulse generator off of a 1983 Honda Shadow VT750, for $15, plus $5 shipping. What did I have to lose?

This assembly arrived two days later. Both pulse generators tested within specifications, and it routed perfectly into the crankcase.

Now it’s time to button this thing up and see if we have spark.