BARN FIND: 1960-something Honda Dream – $300 (Richmond)

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SOLD: 1986 Honda Shadow VT1100C

THIS BIKE HAS BEEN SOLD!

I picked up this 1986 Honda Shadow VT1100C a few months ago and started restoring it for a bobber project. I’ve got it running now, but other projects are taking priority. This will make a great bobber, or it comes with a box of parts for complete restoration. The motor has about 52,000 miles on it, but is still running strong. It could be road-ready with solid weekend’s worth of work.

Here’s the good news:
  • Clean Virginia title
  • Strong motor with great compression
  • Transmission shifts through all gears
  • Newly sealed gas tank
  • New battery
  • New spark plugs
  • Fresh oil change and new filter
  • Recently cleaned air filter
  • Recent radiator flush
  • Exhaust in good shape
  • Original seat in EXCELLENT condition
  • All lights operational
  • Excellent clutch operation
  • Excellent front and rear brake function
  • Excellent front brake disks /rotors
  • Good rear drum brake shoes
  • No fluid leaks (it’s a Honda!)
  • Comes with physical Haynes manual and electronic Honda Shop Manual
  • The bike comes with a set of aftermarket turn signals and stems that just need to be installed.
Here’s the bad news:
  • Missing right side battery cover
  • Front and read tires hold air, but have dry rot
  • Missing fuse box cover
  • Surface rust on exhaust heat shield (appears to just chrome deterioration)
  • Broken turn signal stems (signals still work) (aftermarket replacement signals included in sale)
While I don’t offer a warranty on any used or project bikes I sell, I’m always willing to share technical knowledge with people who purchase my bikes. If you’re local, I’m also happy to lend a hand turning a wrench on a Saturday afternoon (as long as you provide the beer).

Check out the listing on eBay.

Project Bike: 1986 Honda VT1100C

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In April, I picked up another broken-down mid-1980s Honda Shadow, hoping to restore it to glory just like I did with 1984 Honda Shadow VT700C Bobber Project. This “new” bike is a 1986 Honda Shadow VT1100C, and I’m hoping the extra horsepower will give me an opportunity to enjoy it a bit before selling it. The VT700 was very peppy, but it was a bit underpowered for a big boy like me.

The VT1100 is in much better shape than the last Shadow. I was able to get it running today after reinstalling the air box and connecting a new battery. The fuel line to the rear carb is leaking, but this is any easy fix. I’ve also resealed the gas tank, and I am now waiting the requisite 96 hours for it to cure.

I ran the bike today off of the reserve tank today, and it started up fine, putted at low RPM, but when I gave it a bit more gas, it died. I suspect the fuel leak is causing the carb to suck in air through the fuel line. Again, it’s an easy fix, except I have to remove the air box again.

I’m hoping to have this bike ready for sale by the end of July. If you’re looking for a good “budget” cruiser, let me know.

Photo Gallery: 1984 Honda VT 700C Bobber Project

This 1984 Honda Shadow VT 700C is being rebuilt from the ground up, and then chopped back down again to create a bobber.

Vote on Your Favorite Color for the Honda Bobber

It’s almost time to start bolting the last pieces back together on the 1984 Honda Shadow VT 700C Bobber Project. The responses from the previous Post-Apocalyptic Zombie Bobber survey were a bit unclear, so I decided to give ya’ll a simple choice: what color should I paint this bike? Here are a few mockups, so let me know what you think. If your preferred color isn’t there, let me know, and I’ll see if i can mock it up, too!

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Floor Matte Black

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Gunmetal Gray

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Lil’ Boy Blue

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Fabulous! Pink

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You Can Pry My Assault Rifle Out of My Dead, Cold Hands Green

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Rusted Red

Barn Find: 1978 Honda Hawk – $1000 (Glover Park)

1978 Honda Hawk CB400 for sale. Ran last year, but I let it sit and now it won’t start. It is orange with a windjammer fairing. The seat is original, but it has a split in it. Last year I replaced the chain, got the carbs cleaned, and had the wiring redone. It needs work but is a solid bike. I took it all the way to N. Carolina on the Blue Ridge Parkway last summer and it ran like a dream.

The pic is from last year, so the muffler has some rust and it needs to be cleaned up. A good project or part bike.

  • Location: Glover Park
  • it’s NOT ok to contact this poster with services or other commercial interests

Posting ID: 3675126851

Posted: 2013-03-11, 8:43PM EDT

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2013 International Motorcycle Show – Washington, DC

Oden Motor Shop doesn’t have much of a travel budget, so we don’t get to do the trade show circuit very often. When we do, it usually involves months of planning, loads of money, and lots of headaches. If Sturgis or Daytona are involved, there’s usually a pricey divorce shortly after. You can imagine my excitement when I learned the 2013 Progressive International Motorcycle Show was being held the first week of January in Washington, DC, right across the Potomac river from our shop in Alexandria, VA. All I had to do was find parking in downtown DC. Here is a sample of what I saw there.

Pulse Generator Transplant

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After troubleshooting every other electrical component on my 1984 Honda Shadow VT700C, I determined I’m not getting spark because I have a bad pulse generator. Later model bikes use a single pulse, but the ’84 VT700C has two pulse generators, one for each cylinder. This equates to double the possibility of failure and headache cubed when one or the other it actually does fail, since they have to be replaced together as an assembly.

Testing the pulse generators is a pretty simple process of disconnecting the pulse generator assembly from the rest of the electrical system and taking an OHM reading on the leads for each pulse generator. The connector is easily assessable, tucked away on the right side of the crankcase by the fuel filter.

One of the pulse generators tested at 440 OHMs, well within tolerances. The other pegged out my multimeter, indicating a bad pulse generator.

Finding a “new” OEM replacement proved to be impossible. At least three websites claimed to have the part, but when I spoke to a live salesperson, in each case I was told the part was discontinued and no one manufactures a replacement.

I tracked down a used pulse generator assembly on eBay. It’s amazing that idiots like me desperate enough to spend $100 for a $10 part. Since the one I picked up was the lowest priced on eBay, and since the VT700 is scrap metal without one, I considered myself lucky.

While testing the pulse generators is easy, replacing them is a pain. I had to remove the right foot controls, the right-side exhaust, part of the frame, the right crank case cover, and both the clutch inner and outer.

Before installing the “new” pulse generator assembly and putting the bike back together, I decided to test it. Just like the original, it had one good pulse generator and one failed pulse generator.

In the spirit of Dr. Frankenstein, I began hacking at the two assemblies, tossing the bad generators in the junk bin and cobbling the two good generators into a single pulse generator assembly.

When I began routing the pulse generator wiring back through the crankcase, I discovered I had shorted one cable by half an inch. Clearances are tight in the crank case, with the wiring routed around several moving parts, so that half inch may as well have been a mile.

I set my Frankenstein’s monster of a pulse generator assembly to the side, and decided to take a break to check my email and check the status of some other parts on order from eBay. On a whim, I checked to see if anyone had posted another pulse generator assembly.

And there it was: a pulse generator off of a 1983 Honda Shadow VT750, for $15, plus $5 shipping. What did I have to lose?

This assembly arrived two days later. Both pulse generators tested within specifications, and it routed perfectly into the crankcase.

Now it’s time to button this thing up and see if we have spark.

SOLD: 1985 Honda VT700C Project Bike

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SOLD

Oden Motor Shop has 1985 Honda Shadow VT700C for Sale! This is a great project bike with 32,000 miles on engine. It’s running and has good compression, but needs new head gaskets, carbs cleaned, fluids changed, and some TLC.

It has a minor dent in the tank, which is repairable, and the tank is free of rust. The are other minor cosmetic issues, but it is a complete, working bike. Used parts are readily available via eBay, and Oden Motor Shop has a small inventory of parts for this model as well.

The tires still have at least 10,000 miles left in them, and the bike is still a smooth ride. It comes with a clean title and Honda Service Manual. The price is $899.00, or Best Offer.

All sales are final, but as with all Project Bikes supplied by Oden Moto Shop, it comes with 90 days of email shop support.

For more information, please email curtis@OdenMotorShop.com.

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Melting the Parts-cycle

I knew rebuilding a 1984 Honda VT700C was going to challenge my meager skills, but I didn’t expect to be stopped in my tracks by a bad stator that refused to separate from the clutch cover.

At first I thought it was just an issue of leverage: it’s hard to get a solid grip the stator in one hand and the clutch cover in the other. I did manage to get what I felt was a good grip, and proceeded to twist and tug and turn and tap (and maybe bang a little), but that stator didn’t budge.

I got online and surfed the forums for a clue as to where I was going wrong. Did Ibmiss a hidden bolt? Did it pull straight off or thread onto the case (the new stator seemed to be finely threaded). My usual go-to site for the VT700C, HondaShadow.net, was silent on the issue.

I was tired, frustrated, and seriously considering parting the rest of the bike out on eBay. Then I did what I should have done five minutes after figuring out the stator was stuck: I called Big Daddy for advice.

He took time out of his shop renovation project (new drywall, new shelves, and an actual ceiling instead of bare beams) to listen to my problem. I texted over a few photos of the stator and clutch case so he could see the fresh batch of heartache I’d managed to find.

But, of course, Big Daddy had the answer.

He told me to head down to Autozone and pick up a can of CRC Freeze-Off, which is designed to dissolve rust and other muck that can cause bolts, screws and parts to bind together.

I picked up a $5 can of CRC Freez-Off (and another $50 worth of tools I don’t really need but probably will some day).

Back in the garage, I used the Freeze-Off ti liberally soaked the rim of clutch cover where the stator attached. I could see the grime dissolving and rinsing away at the edge, but I was skeptical about it actually penetrating deep enough to unlock the part. I started tugging and twisting and pulling again, but nothing happened.

I read the back of the Freez-Off can again, but paid attention to the instructions to “wait two minutes’. So I sprayed again and waited.

After two minutes, I got my grip on the clutch cover and stator, and I started twisting and wiggling. After a few seconds, I felt the stator shift a quarter of an inch on the clutch cover. I started pulling and wiggling some more, and with surprisingly little muscle, the stator popped right off.

CRC Freez-Off delivered on its promise once, but I had another test for it to prove if this was just luck, or if it actually works.

The clutch bolt where it attaches to the clutch slave cylinder was so stuck I was worried bout stripping the bolt if I put any more muscle (or body weight) into it. So I used the CRC Freeze-Off again.

It took a couple of applications, several minutes of waiting, and a little more muscle than the stator, but I managed to loosen the bolt from the clutch slave cylinder without stripping it or hurting myself.

So, CRC’s Freeze-Off gets top accolades from Oden Motor Shop.