Technological Terror

After running the ’77 Ironhead (aka Imperial Entanglement) for the past few months with a “temporary” Plasti Dip paint job, I decided it was time to give it a more permanent paint job.

My plan is to show a lot of bare metal with black primer accents, and seal it under a nice layer of clear coat.

Shortly after I did the original Plasti Dip paint job, I managed to spill a few drops of gasoline on the tank. The result wasn’t pleasant.

I peaked off the ruined Plasti Dip and reapplied another layer over the original purple paint. Because a little gas spillage is inevitable, this time around finished the Plasti Dip paint job with an acrylic clear coat.

The result was beautiful, and it almost looked like a real paint job.

Unfortunately, that clear coat / Plasti Dip came back to haunt me when started the process of repainting the tank.

Apparently, clear-coated Plasti Dip is highly resistant to paint strippers, including Aircraft Stripper. Additionally, the process seems to create an ultra-hard shell (after a few minutes of goopy nastiness) that can only be removed with a lot of elbow grease and power tools.

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Is Plasti Dip Gasoline Resistant?

No. Performix Plasti Dip is absolutely NOT gasoline resistant. At all.

The gas tank on my 1977 Ironhead Sportster can attest to this. Granted, my original Plasti Dip paint job wasn’t all that great, and it is definitely my fault for not screwing on the gas cap tight enough.

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As you can see from the photo, the gasoline that spilled out of the tank ate up the Plasti Dip. It was an instantaneous chemical reaction: there was no time to clean off the tank before the gas turned the texture of the Plasti Dip into something reminiscent of a char grilled lizard.

I don’t want to repaint the whole tank, so I plan to follow one of the tutorials I’ve seen on YouTube showing how to repair Plasti Dip. I’ll post the results.